Repowering the Western Economy

Repowering the Western Economy is the umbrella for CNEE’s work with Western states and utilities as they transition to clean energy sources. While this dialogue began in 2014 in response to EPA’s Clean Power Plan, the rapid policy and technology changes underway in the Western electricity sector did not end with it. Today, CNEE remains at the forefront of helping Western states and utilities successfully navigate these new frontiers as they develop and implement their climate and clean energy plans.

Explore our work below.

Repowering the Western Economy is the umbrella for CNEE’s work with Western states and utilities as they transition to clean energy sources. While this dialogue began in 2014 in response to EPA’s Clean Power Plan, the rapid policy and technology changes underway in the Western electricity sector did not end with it. Today, CNEE remains at the forefront of helping Western states and utilities successfully navigate these new frontiers as they develop and implement their climate and clean energy plans.

Explore our work below.

Western Interconnect Regional Electricity Dialogue (WIRED)

In early 2020, CNEE, at the request of the Western Energy Industry Leaders (WEIL), convened a group of Western governors’ energy advisors along with a small but diverse group of experts representing utilities, power marketing administrations, renewable energy companies, and clean energy advocates. The goal of this effort, referred to as the Western Interconnect Regional Electricity Dialogue (WIRED), is to provide a set of policy recommendations to governors. To achieve this goal, CNEE continues to facilitate a series of work group meetings to discuss and analyze a range of regional electricity issues including state clean energy and climate policies, transmission development, and resource adequacy (RA).

States are implementing two primary, yet parallel policy approaches to reduce emissions from the electric power sector: (1) transition to renewable and non-emitting resources and (2) direct regulation of greenhouse gas emissions. While these two programmatic approaches are rooted in the same purpose―to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and ultimately decarbonize the electric grid―they focus on different ways to achieve this goal.
Ensuring adequate resources for reliability has always been a cornerstone of utility service. The availability and type of generation resources and new technologies are changing rapidly and market participants are implementing new ways to integrate resources across the Western Interconnection. There are challenges and opportunities as the West transitions to a cleaner grid. A collaborative and coordinated effort by the states, utilities, market participants and advocates can address these challenges and embrace the opportunities.
The transmission planning and development working group report builds upon the foundation and recommendations from the WIRED Resource Adequacy Working Group and works in harmony with the recommendations of the GHG Working Group. Ultimately, transmission planning and development is a mechanism to preserve reliability, facilitate access to low-cost energy and achieve resource and policy goals, and is not an end in and of itself.

Clean Fuel Standards Workshop

CNEE and the Great Plains Institute hosted a Clean Fuel Standards (CFS) Workshop in Santa Fe, NM on September 30, 2021.  Attendees included state officials, technical experts, decision makers, and companies developing cutting edge technology to lower the carbon intensity of transportation fuels.  A clean fuel standard creates an enforceable limit that fossil fuel providers must comply with by purchasing credits from low-carbon fuel providers, thereby reducing emissions and incentivizing greater competitiveness in the marketplace for transportation fuels.

New Mexico Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory and Forecast

Tri-State Generation and Transmission's Responsible Energy Plan

In 2019, Governor Ritter and CNEE led an advisory group process to help Tri-State Generation and Transmission develop their Responsible Energy Plan, announced in January 2020.

Jeffrey Ackermann

Senior Policy Advisor

Jeff Ackermann served as chairman of the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC) from January 2017 until January 2021.  During that tenure Jeff presided over some of the most dramatic clean energy developments in Colorado’s regulated electric sector, spanning from accelerated retirement of fossil-fuel generating resources to grid modernization and electrification of the transportation sector.  Concurrently in 2019-2020, Jeff served as chair of the Energy Resources and the Environment Committee of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners.

Prior to serving as PUC chair, Jeff served as director of the Colorado Energy Office in the Hickenlooper Administration for four years, starting in 2013.  In this capacity, Jeff provided leadership for various initiatives that expanded the state’s clean energy agenda.

Jeff draws upon extensive experience in staff and leadership roles, within the Colorado PUC and various organizations developing and implementing innovative energy efficiency programs and addressing the needs of income-stressed households.  Jeff has a Master’s of Nonprofit Management degree from Regis University and an Environmental Economic Policy degree from Albion College.

 Jeffrey.Ackermann@colostate.edu

Search CNEE